Parsi New Year 2023: Date, History and Significance

By Kumar Jitendra

Parsi New Year, which is also called Navroz or Nowruz, is a joyous occasion celebrated between July and August. This year, it will be celebrated on August 16th

Parsi New Year, which is also called Navroz or Nowruz, is a joyous occasion celebrated between July and August. This year, it will be celebrated on August 16th। This cherished festival, whose roots are in the Persian words "Nav" and "Roz", which means "new day", has a rich history spanning more than 3,000 years.

The Parsi community in India uses the Shahenshahi calendar, even though the world's celebration of Navroz falls on March 21, the day of the Spring Equinox. Due to the peculiar calendar's disregard for leap years, the celebration date is 200 days later than planned.

History of the Parsi New Year 

Cultural and Historical Importance 

The celebration has origins in Zorostrianism, one of the earliest monotheistic religions in the world. It began more than 3,500 years ago in ancient Iran when Prophet Zarathustra, a great man, preached this faith. The bliss of Zorostrianism persisted for 1,400 years, until the 7th century, when the Islam religion began to gain ground. Many Zorostrianisms abandoned their homes in Iran as a result of this upheaval and moved to India and Pakistan. A new ethnic group known as the Parsis established there and found protection. The narrative of Jamshed, a mythical monarch who escaped a terrible winter that threatened extermination, is the source of the celebration.

Celebration of Parsi New Year

Parsis are the biggest single group in India, with the largest Parsi communities located in the states of Gujarat and Maharashtra. On this day, people clean their houses and decorate them with flowers and rangolis as they pray for wealth and good health. They dress in costume and go to the "Agiary," or fire temple, where they offer milk, flowers, fruits, and sandalwood to the sacred fire.

The Four Fs—fire, fragrance, food, and friendship—center the celebrations. Enjoying scrumptious Parsi food, asking for pardon for the mistakes of the previous year, purging one's mind, and starting the new year with love and harmony are all part of the celebration. For a complete feast, Parsis prepare dishes like prawn patio, mori dar, patra ni macchi, haleem, akoori, sali boti, saffron pulao, and falooda. Parsis decorate or place many items on their tables to make them distinctive, such as a holy book, a mirror, fragrant sticks, fruits, lovely flowers, bright coins, candles, a bowl with a goldfish, and a portrait of Zarathustra.